PDF: Lymphoid lesions of salivary glands: Malignant and Benign

Lesions of salivary glands with a prominent lymphoid component are a heterogeneous group of diseases that include benign reactive lesions and malignant neoplasms.

Chronic-Sclerosing-Sialadenitis


Occasionally, these pathologic entities present difficulties in the clinical and pathological diagnosis and prognosis. Lymphoepithelial sialadenitis, HIV-associated salivary gland disease, chronic sclerosing sialadenitis, Warthin tumor, and extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma are examples of this pathology that are sometimes problematic to differentiate from one another. In this paper the author reviewed the main clinical, pathological and prognostic features of these lesions.


Introduction

Lymphocytic infiltrates of the major salivary glands are involved in a spectrum of diseases that range from reactive to benign and malignant neoplasms. In many cases, the lymphocytic infiltrate is a minor inflammatory component that is easily distinguished from the primary disease processes. In some cases, however, the lymphocytic infiltrate is a major component of the disease, and histopathologic features that distinguish reactive and benign lesions from malignant lesions are often subtle.

Lymphoepithelial sialadenitis (as occurs in Sjögren syndrome), HIV-associated sialadenitis, and extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma are good examples of diagnoses that are often problematic to differentiate from one another.

In this paper, benign and malignant diseases of salivary gland with a prominent lymphocytic component will be discussed with an emphasis on their distinguishing histopathologic featurers and differential diagnoses.




Related Item

Tráfico Semanal

Get our newsletter